Join The New Children’s Museum in supporting the quest for a cure for childhood cancer.

Two thousand delicately folded origami paper cranes will flock in delicate clusters in The New Children’s Museum atrium from September 6 through October 7, 2017. Each crane honors one of the approximately 2,000 children in the United States who pass away from cancer each year. The art installation commemorates national Childhood Cancer Awareness Month, remembering and supporting those families affected by cancer.

When her son Joey passed away in 2014 from a rare cancer, Kathy Liu began folding paper cranes as a means of healing. Joey was a curious and enthusiastic musician, artist and athlete who, among his many interests, loved experimenting with origami, the Japanese art of folding paper. In remembrance of her son’s life, Kathy began making paper crane decorations for children’s IVs as a way of maintaining hope for a cure for childhood cancer. This project grew into Joey’s Wings, a non-profit that raises money for research as well as support systems for families with children who are undergoing treatment.

In Japanese culture, the crane is believed to be one of the most mystical creatures and is said to live for a thousand years.  The crane represents a prayer and wish for recovery, a powerful symbol of joy during a difficult time. According to ancient Japanese legend, anyone who folds a thousand origami cranes will be granted one wish. With the 2,000 folded cranes that fly above visitors of the Museum, we ask for two wishes to be granted: CURE and CURE!

Join The New Children’s Museum as we celebrate hope and healing. Visit the Museum every Saturday during the month of September to fold your own paper crane, which you can choose to donate to Joey’s Wings for future installations or for IV decorations through the Cranes for a Cure program.

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